Home

Home Practitioners Services FAQ Links Contacts


Services

Acupuncture

Acupuncture actually is composed of many components and techniques:

Chinese Herbal Medicine

Chinese Tui Na massage

Qigong/meditation

Diet therapy

Needling acupuncture needling is the medical practice of inserting very fine needles into specific acupuncture points on the body. There are over 360 points located on 12 main and 8 extra meridians traversing the body. In addition to these points, there are additional point locations and micro-systems of the ear, scalp, hand, etc.

Acupuncture needles are very fine and are typically made from metals. Patients frequently report that treatment is painless and they do not even feel the insertion of the needles. In our clinic, we use only sterile, disposable, single-use needles. Commonly, we will stimulate (twist) the needle in order to activate the Qi (energy) to enhance the treatment result. Acupuncture points can be stimulated in a variety of other ways that include:

Moxibustion - external herbal heat therapy.  Moxibustion is can be applied indirectly through a moxa stick or adhesive moxa, or directly by placing a small amount of moxa on the skin and burning it, heating and tonifying the body.

Gua sha - stimulation of the skin with a broad flat instrument, which increases the qi and blood flow to the area.

Electro-acupuncture - electrodes are clipped to the needles and a very low current is passed through the needles to stimulate the acupuncture points on the body.

Plum-blossom technique - cutaneous stimulation of the skin with short needles. This method is often used for patients who do not want needle insertion or in the case of skin diseases.

Ear seeds stimulation of the ear acupuncture points using a small seed or bead.

Cupping suction stimulation, applied to draw out "evil pathogens" from the body and to increase the flow of qi and blood to an area.

These various therapies are selected after a diagnosis and treatment plan are formulated.

Chinese Herbal Medicine

Chinese Herbal Medicine is actually called Chinese Drug Therapy in China because it uses a wide variety of substances and therapeutic modalities. Plant, animal and mineral substances are all included in the Materia Medica of Chinese Drug Therapy. The earliest uses date back at least 4,000 years to the Shang dynasty. The herbal tradition of China is valued scientifically, as well as being a fascinating and popular tradition. Scientists working in China and Japan during the past four decades have demonstrated that the herb materials contain active components that can explain many of their claimed actions. The most common methods of applying herb therapies are to make a decoction (a strong tea that must be simmered for about an hour or more), extract powders (or granules), and patent medicine (tablets or capsules, which are smooth, easy-to-swallow) and to make large honey-bound pills. Both of these forms meet with considerable resistance in Western countries. The teas are deemed too time-consuming, smelly, and awful-tasting to justify their use, and the honey pills (boluses) are sticky, difficult to chew, and bad tasting. Thus, modern forms that are more acceptable have been developed for most applications. In most cases, we will design a specific formulation for an individual patient, which might be changed frequently over a course of treatment. In other cases, one or more formulas already prepared for ingestion without modification are selected for use.

Chinese Tui Na massage

Chinese Tui Na massage is commonly used for musculoskeletal conditions. It is a Chinese style of massage, using various massage techniques including kneading, pressing, rolling, shaking, and stretching the body in an effort to regulate the functions of channels and collaterals, Qi and blood, and internal organs and to recover the functionality of tendons, bones and joints. We will assess your condition and then tailor a treatment to your needs. Sometimes we will use a liniment or massage oil during the treatment.

Qigong/meditation

Qigong is the practice of integrating breath, body, and mind so as to enrich and coordinate the functions of essence (Jing) energy (Qi) and spirit (Shen) to enhance vitality and prevent disease.

Diet therapy

For thousands of years, Traditional Chinese Medicine has understood the importance of diet, lifestyle and exercise in maintaining good health and preventing form illness. We also prescribe diet recipe for you to integrate with your daily food. It is simple and effective.

 
Home Practitioners Services FAQ Links Contacts

Copyright Since 2006